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Rosewood fretboard versus Ebony?

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  • Rosewood fretboard versus Ebony?

    What can I expect with a rosewood Fretboard versus the typical ebony on a USA custom shop Dinky?

  • #2
    brown streaky wood of varying shades with lots of nooks and crevices
    vs
    brown streaky to black wood with tight grain

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    • #3
      Good to know!
      Thnaks

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      • #4
        I've been playing guitars for over 15 years. With jumbo frets I don't really feel any difference. I generally prefer the look of ebony over rosewood, but the nicest rosewood boards are often as beautiful as a typical ebony board.

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        • #5
          I like both all black ebony boards or highly figured rosewood boards. With jumbo and especially extra jumbo frets, rosewood isn`t a problem from finger drag on the fingerboard. I have to adjust pressure on medium jumbo frets or smaller. I`d rather not feel the fingerboard.

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          • #6
            Ebony is KING in my book. The standard fretboard for top o' the line Jacksons due to its and it has a crisp attack that rosewood can't match.
            '95 Charvel San Dimas USA Model I Koa - BKP
            '91 Charvel 650 Custom - EMG 85/SLV/SLV+SPC
            '92 Jackson Soloist Pro MIJ
            '91 Charvel 475 Exotic Cherry Sunburst - Duncan PATB set
            '90 Charvel 475 XL
            '10 Charvel San Dimas MIJ Style 1 2H - JB/'59
            Mesa Boogie Quad Preamp/Stereo Simul-Class 2:90
            Mesa Boogie MkIII+ Simul-Class & MkIVb with Mark Series stack
            Marshall JVM410H

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            • #7
              Ebony is harder than rosewood. Tone will be brighter and pinch harmonics will come off easier, You will also notice a slight increase in sustain.
              [sigpic=true][/sigpic]

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              • #8
                Ebony lends to a sharper, snappier attack.

                I also find ebony to require less maintenance. The tighter grain picks up less dirt and oil and as a result requires less cleaning and conditioning. YMMV.

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                • #9
                  Just to point out from previous comments:
                  1. When you use effects, you hear less of the natural tone from woods. And, in some cases, you even compensate tonality by using your effects without even realizing it.
                  2. Ebony isn't always black, so those of you liking the look of it need to be more specific. Even when it is black, sometimes you are looking at a dye job.

                  And, me, personally, I have always found ebony to feel gritty. Not rough gritty like sand. But more like there is a soft layer of something on it, and when you press down you kind of feel like you are sinking in to the fretboard.

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