Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone use 8-38 or even 7-38 gauge strings, in STANDARD TUNING, 6-string, with Floyd?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Update: I found a local source that stocks the Dunlop Billy Gibbons (7-38) gauge set. If I buy and install them, I will provide another review.

    Originally posted by CaptNasty View Post
    Now I have 12 boxes of D’Addario 9s that I am not using.
    Those might be worth using in E-flat-standard or D-standard tuning, or even drop-D-flat like you said you use where the 8s were too spaghetti-like.

    Originally posted by pianoguyy View Post
    They also make an 8.5. Like, seriously - 8.5? Because 0.008" is too light and 0.009" is too heavy?
    That's precisely it. I haven't tried them since I don't need that level of granularity, but you can really fine-tune your tension preferences with those half-gauge sets.

    Comment


    • #17
      I've only had a few playing sessions with the Ernie Ball 8-38 set and they're already starting to tarnish. I don't know why, but for me, Ernie Ball strings don't last very long, while D'Addario lasts far longer. And I don't know why I've seen other people swear by Ernie Ball strings for their longevity and hate D'Addario for going dead quickly. On one guitar, I tried coated Ernie Ball strings and they tarnished faster than uncoated strings, which baffled me. Maybe Ernie Ball strings don't play nice with my climate or my skin oil chemistry. I think I'm just not meant to enjoy Ernie Ball strings and I'll never be like the great list of artists listed on the back of every pack of Ernie Ball strings who are loyal to the brand.

      A great string type I've been enjoying on another guitar is D'Addario XT (but 9-46 gauge). High carbon steel strings that are treated/coated, but feel like uncoated strings, which apparently replaces their EXP line (which I also previously enjoyed). I've had about the same number of hours of playing on this XT-equipped guitar as I have with the Ernie Ball 8-38 set and they still look, feel, and sound brand new. I hope D'Addario considers releasing an 8-38 set in their XT format. Maybe I should try their 8-38 NYXL set.

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Number Of The Priest View Post
        I've only had a few playing sessions with the Ernie Ball 8-38 set and they're already starting to tarnish. I don't know why, but for me, Ernie Ball strings don't last very long, while D'Addario lasts far longer. And I don't know why I've seen other people swear by Ernie Ball strings for their longevity and hate D'Addario for going dead quickly. On one guitar, I tried coated Ernie Ball strings and they tarnished faster than uncoated strings, which baffled me. Maybe Ernie Ball strings don't play nice with my climate or my skin oil chemistry. I think I'm just not meant to enjoy Ernie Ball strings and I'll never be like the great list of artists listed on the back of every pack of Ernie Ball strings who are loyal to the brand.

        A great string type I've been enjoying on another guitar is D'Addario XT (but 9-46 gauge). High carbon steel strings that are treated/coated, but feel like uncoated strings, which apparently replaces their EXP line (which I also previously enjoyed). I've had about the same number of hours of playing on this XT-equipped guitar as I have with the Ernie Ball 8-38 set and they still look, feel, and sound brand new. I hope D'Addario considers releasing an 8-38 set in their XT format. Maybe I should try their 8-38 NYXL set.
        ernie balls don't last for shit for me, either. I'm in the same boat as you with EB and d'addario. one thing about the ernie ball coated strings is only the wounds strings are coated. the plains are just normal plains, the same you'd get in a slinky pack. they're not "anti-tarnish" plains like elixir makes.

        NYXL d'addarios are good strings but I didn't find that that lasted any longer than XL's.

        Comment


        • #19
          The tarnishing primarily affects my ability to bend the high strings, where the tarnish grinds against the frets, and less so for the wound strings... so for a company to not coat the strings that matter most for bending is very odd to me. Thanks for that info. I guess I'll finish using my current supply of Ernie Ball and then try the Dunlop Billy Gibbons 7-38 set I managed to find locally, hoping Dunlops last longer than Ernie Balls.

          Comment


          • #20
            figured I'd post this here... I just received a guitar last week with 9-42 strings in standard tuning (25.5" scale). I thought the guitar sounded like ass, both plugged in and unplugged. that is, until I switched the bottom three strings to 46 gauge. also upped the action a bit. now it sounds great unplugged! plugged in it's still lacking, but I've never gotten along with the SH-6 so that's no surprise. I have a super d on the way that should fix that.

            anyway my point is I think a 38 on the bottom would be doing a disservice to any guitar. I need that strong fundamental tone on the bottom strings.

            Comment


            • #21
              Interesting perspective. I can't say I've noticed a difference in tone whenever I'm using 8-38, 9-42, or 9-46 in standard tuning on a 25.5" scale guitar. The major advantage for me was the easier playability by choosing lighter strings. Good enough for me and I'm glad my tone didn't suffer, otherwise I'd have a dilemma on my hands. Would I choose playability over tone every time? It's hard to say.

              It's possible some guitars just have their best voice when certain variables are correctly selected for them. That might include certain pickups, certain strings, a certain setup, etc. that all contribute to bringing the best out of that particular guitar. Guitars are so individual that on some of my guitars I'm able to achieve ridiculously low action while on other guitars I need to raise the action to prevent bent notes from choking, despite my setup skills and procedure being the exact same when setting up guitars in both scenarios.

              Comment


              • #22
                Many people talk about thicker strings giving a better tone. But then you go and play a bass guitar or 7-string guitar, or any number of "cultural" or other alternative instruments.
                And someone like me, with access to pianos. which have over 200 strings... you can certainly hear a difference.

                So, it was nice to see Rick Beato do the work that shows otherwise.


                But, like all things 'music' - you have to do what you have to do in order to do what you have to do.

                Comment


                • #23
                  these days I do A/B recordings (both DI and mic'd amp) pretty much every time I do anything to my guitars... just anal like that. you simply cannot trust your memory and it gives me great pleasure being to both hear and see the difference that modifications and setup changes can make.

                  just watched (skimmed) the beato vid. yeah, those 9's and 8's sound fucking awful to my ears. almost no fundamental on the low notes, they have this anemic metallic ringing sound to them that you can't get rid of except by playing with a feather's touch. and the 10's didn't sound great there either, but that's probably because it's a short scale. the 11's sound TUFF
                  Last edited by metalhobo; 10-05-2021, 06:42 PM.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X